Mozilla Monthly Meetup - October specer Topic's

This is for summarized details of your own topics.

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A week after the latest Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” release, Matthias Klose from Ubuntu dev team has now kicked off the development of the next version, Ubuntu 21.04 — codenamed “Hirsute Hippo.“

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The esoteric programming language

An esolang is not designed for commonplace software development purposes. They are intended as a proof of concept, as software art, as a hacking interface to another language, or as a joke.

Here is a few of them

Malbolge

1998 by Ben Olmsted

Intercal

1972 by Jim Lyon and Don Wood

Brainfuck

1993 by Urban Muller

Cow

2003 by Sean Herber

Whitespace

2003 by Chris Morris

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A Project as documented on GitHub: Project boards on GitHub help you organize and prioritize your work. You can create project boards for specific feature work, comprehensive roadmaps, or even release checklists. With project boards, you have the flexibility to create customized workflows that suit your needs.

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Hackerrank.com is a website with free code challenges. There are problems of many different languages. There are tutorials and free certifications too. It is really helpful to test our skills in programming languages we have already learnt. The problem scenarios are a bit tricky and make us improve our problem solving skills.

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Bro, you better write an article about this, seems interesting and I think the majority of the audience should know about this too, in detail.
Kudos!

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What is Social Engineering?

It is the art of hacking the human mind. It is usually done by doing some recon about the selected victim. The way the thinks, likes and dislikes etc., so the social engineer can create a more favorable scenario for the victim to be a part of, in a way the victim unknowingly reveal whatever data the hacker or the social engineer wants to know. For example contact number, credit card details etc.

Kernel-Based Virtual Machine (KVM)

Video Link : Run macOS on Linux using KVM
(Remember, you can run any operating system, but here we’ll be covering macOS)

KVM is a Level 1 hypervisor, available only as a Linux kernel module, used to run virtual machines. It has more performance than VirtualBox or VMware Workstation (Level 2 hypervisors), which run on top of an operating system, while KVM runs directly on the kernel.

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